White House:-Trump Believes Millions Voted Illegally

Trump talks replacing Obamacare, reiterates unsubstantiated voter fraud claims
Trump renews false claim of illegal ballots 03:04
Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump believes millions of votes were cast illegally in last year’s election, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said on Tuesday, but he wouldn’t provide any concrete evidence for the claim, which has long been debunked.

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“The President does believe that, I think he’s stated that before, and stated his concern of voter fraud and people voting illegally during the campaign and continues to maintain that belief based on studies and evidence people have brought to him,” Spicer said.
    Pressed for what evidence exists, Spicer would say only that Trump “has believed that for a while based on studies and information he has.”
    When pushed about whether Trump will call for an investigation into the voter fraud, Spicer said, “maybe we will.”
    Trump surprised the top Republicans and Democrats in Congress on Monday when, during a dinner at the White House, he repeated his claim that millions of undocumented immigrants voted for Hillary Clinton — allegedly depriving him of the popular vote, according to two sources familiar with the meeting.
    Trump lost the popular vote to Hillary Clinton by nearly 3 million votes in November, but won the Electoral College and thus the presidency. Trump, however, has seemingly been fixated on the popular vote, tweeting after the election in November that, “In addition to winning the Electoral College in a landslide, I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally.”
    A number of studies have found no evidence of widespread voter fraud.
    The Truth About Voter Fraud, a report written by experts at The Brennan Center for Justice, found voter fraud rates were between 0.00004% and 0.0009%.
    “Given this tiny incident rate for voter impersonation fraud, it is more likely, the report noted, that an American will be struck by lightning than that he will impersonate another voter at the polls,” reads the report.
    South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham slammed Trump earlier Tuesday over the claim.
    “I wasn’t there, but if the President of the United States is claiming that 3.5 million people voted illegally, that shakes confidence in our democracy — he needs to disclose why he believes that,” Graham told CNN.
    Spicer said Tuesday that Trump believes in widespread voter fraud, in part, because of a study that found 14% of people who voted were non-citizens.

    Spicer did not say expressly which study Trump has read, but a 2014 study by Jesse Richman and David Earnest found more than 14% of non-citizens in 2008 and 2010 “indicated that they were registered to vote.”
    The authors wrote, in a Washington Post opinion piece, the report showed “that 6.4 percent of non-citizens voted in 2008 and 2.2 percent of non-citizens voted in 2010.”
    The study was designed by Cooperative Congressional Election Study, and in 2014 the group said their sample was so small that it could be incorrect and attributable to normal survey error and not non-citizens saying that they are registered to vote.
    Scott Pruitt, the Oklahoma attorney general who has been nominated to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, testifies at <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/18/politics/scott-pruitt-epa-hearing/" target="_blank">his confirmation hearing</a> on January 18. Pruitt said he doesn't believe climate change is a hoax, but he didn't indicate he would take swift action to address environmental issues that may contribute to climate change. He said there is still debate over how to respond.

    Photos: Trump’s nominees and their confirmation hearings
    Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency – Scott Pruitt, the Oklahoma attorney general who has been nominated to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, testifies at his confirmation hearing on January 18. Pruitt said he doesn’t believe climate change is a hoax, but he didn’t indicate he would take swift action to address environmental issues that may contribute to climate change. He said there is still debate over how to respond.
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    South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley testifies during her confirmation hearing on January 18. <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/17/politics/haley-un-confirmation-hearing/" target="_blank">During her testimony,</a> she rapped the UN for its treatment of Israel and indicated that she thinks the US should reconsider its contribution of 22% of the annual budget. "Are we getting what we pay for?" she asked.

    Photos: Trump’s nominees and their confirmation hearings
    UN Ambassador – South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley testifies during her confirmation hearing on January 18.During her testimony, she rapped the UN for its treatment of Israel and indicated that she thinks the US should reconsider its contribution of 22% of the annual budget. “Are we getting what we pay for?” she asked.
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    Wilbur Ross, center, waits to be introduced by US Sen. Marco Rubio, right, at his confirmation hearing on January 18. Ross is a billionaire investor <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/11/30/investing/wilbur-ross-commerce-secretary-trump/" target="_blank">known for buying up distressed and failing companies.</a> At his confirmation hearing, he said he wants countries that resort to "malicious" trading tactics to be "severely" punished. Specifically, he <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2017/01/18/investing/wilbur-ross-hearing-trump-commerce-secretary/index.html" target="_blank">pointed the finger at China,</a> whom he called "the most protectionist country of very large countries."

    Photos: Trump’s nominees and their confirmation hearings
    Secretary of Commerce – Wilbur Ross, center, waits to be introduced by US Sen. Marco Rubio, right, at his confirmation hearing on January 18. Ross is a billionaire investor known for buying up distressed and failing companies. At his confirmation hearing, he said he wants countries that resort to “malicious” trading tactics to be “severely” punished. Specifically, he pointed the finger at China, whom he called “the most protectionist country of very large countries.”
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    Betsy DeVos, a top Republican donor and school-choice activist,<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/17/politics/betsy-devos-education-secretary-hearing/index.html"> prepares to testify</a> at her confirmation hearing on Tuesday, January 17. DeVos <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/17/politics/betsy-devos-education-nominee-donald-trump/" target="_blank">stood firm in her long-held beliefs</a> that parents -- not the government -- should be able to choose where to send children to school, pledging to push voucher programs if she is confirmed.

    Photos: Trump’s nominees and their confirmation hearings
    Secretary of Education – Betsy DeVos, a top Republican donor and school-choice activist, prepares to testify at her confirmation hearing on Tuesday, January 17. DeVos stood firm in her long-held beliefs that parents — not the government — should be able to choose where to send children to school, pledging to push voucher programs if she is confirmed.
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    US Rep. Ryan Zinke, a former Navy SEAL, is sworn in before <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/17/politics/ryan-zinke-interior-secretary-confirmation-hearing/" target="_blank">his confirmation hearing</a> on January 17. He pledged to review Obama administration actions that limit oil and gas drilling in Alaska, and he said he does not believe climate change is a hoax.

    Photos: Trump’s nominees and their confirmation hearings
    Secretary of the Interior – US Rep. Ryan Zinke, a former Navy SEAL, is sworn in before his confirmation hearing on January 17. He pledged to review Obama administration actions that limit oil and gas drilling in Alaska, and he said he does not believe climate change is a hoax.
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    Ben Carson greets his granddaughter Tesora prior to testifying before the Senate Committee of Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs on Thursday, January 12. <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/12/politics/ben-carson-hud-confirmation-hearing/" target="_blank">In his opening statement,</a> the renowned neurosurgeon and former presidential candidate noted that he was raised by a single mother who had a "third-grade education" and made the case that he understands the issues facing the millions of people who rely on HUD programs.

    Photos: Trump’s nominees and their confirmation hearings
    Secretary of Housing and Urban Development – Ben Carson greets his granddaughter Tesora prior to testifying before the Senate Committee of Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs on Thursday, January 12. In his opening statement, the renowned neurosurgeon and former presidential candidate noted that he was raised by a single mother who had a “third-grade education” and made the case that he understands the issues facing the millions of people who rely on HUD programs.
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    Elaine Chao, Trump's pick for transportation secretary, testifies at <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/11/politics/elaine-chao-transportation-secretary-hearing/index.html" target="_blank">her confirmation hearing</a> on Wednesday, January 11. Chao was deputy secretary of transportation under George H.W. Bush and labor secretary under George W. Bush.

    Photos: Trump’s nominees and their confirmation hearings
    Secretary of Transportation – Elaine Chao, Trump’s pick for transportation secretary, testifies at her confirmation hearing on Wednesday, January 11. Chao was deputy secretary of transportation under George H.W. Bush and labor secretary under George W. Bush.
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    CIA Director – Mike Pompeo is joined by his wife, Susan, as he is sworn in as CIA director by Vice President Mike Pence on Monday, January 23. Pompeo, who is vacating his seat in the US House, was confirmed by the Senate in a 66-32 vote. 16 of 19
    Former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson, Trump's nominee for secretary of state, testifies during his confirmation hearing in Washington on January 11. Tillerson <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/11/politics/tillerson-confirmation-hearing/" target="_blank">drew a sharp line between his views and those of his future boss,</a> denouncing Russian aggression in cyberspace and in Ukraine.

    Photos: Trump’s nominees and their confirmation hearings
    Secretary of State – Former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson, Trump’s nominee for secretary of state, testifies during his confirmation hearing in Washington on January 11. Tillerson drew a sharp line between his views and those of his future boss, denouncing Russian aggression in cyberspace and in Ukraine.
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    US Sen. Jeff Sessions is sworn in prior to his confirmation hearing on Tuesday, January 10.

    Photos: Trump’s nominees and their confirmation hearings
    Attorney General – US Sen. Jeff Sessions is sworn in prior to his confirmation hearing on Tuesday, January 10.
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    In his <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/10/politics/jeff-sessions-confirmation-hearing-expectations/" target="_blank">wide-ranging hearing,</a> Sessions pledged to recuse himself from all investigations involving Hillary Clinton based on inflammatory comments he made during a "contentious" campaign season. He also defended his views of the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade ruling on abortion, saying he doesn't agree with it but would respect it.

    Photos: Trump’s nominees and their confirmation hearings
    Attorney General – In his wide-ranging hearing, Sessions pledged to recuse himself from all investigations involving Hillary Clinton based on inflammatory comments he made during a “contentious” campaign season. He also defended his views of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade ruling on abortion, saying he doesn’t agree with it but would respect it.
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    Mike Pompeo is joined by his wife, Susan, as he is sworn in as CIA director by Vice President Mike Pence on Monday, January 23. Pompeo, who is vacating his seat in the US House, was <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/23/politics/mike-pompeo-cia-director-confirmation-vote/" target="_blank">confirmed by the Senate</a> in a 66-32 vote.

    CIA Director – Mike Pompeo is joined by his wife,
     Susan, as he is sworn in as CIA director by 
    Vice President Mike Pence on Monday, January 23.
     Pompeo, who is vacating his seat in the US House, 
    was confirmed by the Senate in a 66-32 vote.
    Trump’s campaign cited in October a 2012 study from the Pew Charitable Trusts entitled “Inaccurate, Costly and Inefficient: Evidence that American Voter Registration Systems Needs an Upgrade” as backup for that claim. The study found that “about 24 million voter registrations are no longer valid or are significantly inaccurate” and “more than 1.8 million dead people are listed as voters.”
    The study, which is based on 2011 data, is about the need to update voter rolls and underscores deficiencies in the voter registration system, but does not show that people who have registrations in two states are voting twice for Democrats or for Republicans.

    We found millions of out of date registration records due to people moving or dying, but found no evidence that voter fraud resulted.
    David Becker, the primary author of the Pew Report, tweeted in November, “We found millions of out of date registration records due to people moving or dying, but found no evidence that voter fraud resulted.”
    CNN’s Jennifer Agiesta contributed to this report.

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